Harv's Norman supercharger thread

Engine discussion.

Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Tue Dec 08, 2015 12:34 pm

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The Wray on Kevin’s Special was reworked by John Bowles, who machined the nose so that the bearings could accommodate the front engine attachment. Ed Farrar machined the vanes. The Special runs around 7½psi boost, indicated by a Spitfire (aeroplane) boost gauge. The video below shows Kevin’s vehicle at the 2015 Northam Flying 50:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKT8oyDycEE

The Special sees active race service, having beat both a Morgan and a Mazda MX5 at Barbagallo Raceway prior to blowing the gasket between the supercharger and inlet manifold.

Don Tosler (Toesler?), from the Rostrevor area of Adelaide built a mid-engined (Wray-blown 16TS) Renault 750 as a sports sedan hill climber. Mid-build, CAMS changed the rules, banning mid-engined cars and forcing Don to campaign the car under a different class, competing at circuits that included Collingrove.

Don Fraser from Revmaster Engineering Camshafts (Sheldon Street, Norwood) was a 1960s boat racer who had an Amilcar with a Wray-blown 2242cc Whippet motor. Amilcars were made in France between 1922 and 1938, whilst Whippets were made by Overland (Willys) in the US from 1926-1931. Don built the Amilcar in 1975. Pictured below (photos: Fred Radman) is the modified HS8 S.U. carburettor from the Amilcar. This used a Lord mount to hang the float bowl. The 3/16” jet is home-made… and somewhat larger than the factory 0.125”. The needle is stainless steel.

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Don removed the carburettor along with the supercharger prior to sale as he was using it on his new set up. The Wray was subsequently replaced with a Roots supercharger with twin SU carburettors. The vehicle passed from Don’s hands to Neil Sullivan in 1999. The photos below show the Amilcar in it’s Roots-blown format:

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Pictured below (photo: Dave Linton) is Dave Linton’s 1275cc Wray-blown Moke. In the late 1980’s Fred Radman offered Dave a Wray L60 BMC “A” series supercharger kit to install into the Moke. A fresh motor was built, overbored to 0.020” resulting in 1293cc and a compression ratio of 9.75:1. A custom camshaft was re-ground via Chris Milton using the Special Tuning 731 timing. However the lobe centre angle was reduced to 100º. The additional overlap enabled combustion chamber exhaust gas purging with the incoming compressed air/fuel mix. The Moke firewall was modified to allow the drive belt to run directly to the bottom pulley (see the modified red lead painted piece of box chassis section in the photo below). This placed the belt tensioner on the correct side (slack side) of the belt. The alternative (without the box section) places the tensioner on the drive side of the belt. A standard Moke harmonic balancer had a second vee groove cut into it to provide drive for the supercharger. After experimenting with a downdraught D5 S.U. carburettor and a Reece Fish, the carburettor was changed to a downdraught Stromberg as used in a Holden 186 red motor. A variable main metering jet was installed on the carburettor to adjust the fuel mixture. The Moke used a Marvel inverse oiler on the far side of the engine bay (complete with synthetic two-stroke oil). At full noise, the setup generated some 8–9psi of boost. Dave used the Moke daily for six months of the year over a couple of years, as Adelaide has pleasant weather from October to March. The main issue Dave experienced was that of carburettor icing during prolonged light throttle with cold ambient air temperature. Soon after installation the rotor failed, though cutting the fan belt enabled the Moke to be driven home to be repaired. Once the rotor had been replaced there were no other issues with the supercharger. The Moke competed at the Collingrove hillclimb and street drags at AIR. (Adelaide International Raceway). It was driven to the Australian Motorkhana Hay Nationals at Hay, NSW, with the Moke double-entered for two drivers. This is a round trip of some 1300km, with the carburettor icing issue being the only problem experienced on route.

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Note the Wray sticker on the air cleaner. Fred had some of these made up in later years (photo: Fred Radman):

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The photo below again from Dave Linton shows a T96 on a 1275cc Mini motor. The Wray manifolding has a Shorrock blow off valve which was found to seal better than the earlier plate type. Note that the manifold casting has been cut back to allow for a sidedraught carburettor.

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More photos from Dave below:

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Lachlan Kinnear has a Wray on a vintage Vauxhall, whilst John Payne has a Wray on a MG Type 2. Lachlan’s Wray has the earlier cast rotor, and was earlier fitted to a Holden red motor from Mannum, South Australia. Lachlan also has the original Wray belt tensioner arm and inlet manifold.

Mike Adi’s (Advance Headers 16 Braeside Avenue Holden Hill South Australia 5088) Gamma Special Goggomobil was initially configured as a Wray-blown VW engine. The vehicle then moved to a Norman, and later to a Toyota (Aisin) SC14 running around 20psi of boost. The Wray was later sold to Brian Paige who fit it to a Simca. The photos below are from Mike:

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The Aisin-blown vehicle is shown below at Whyalla drags (I have lifted the images and video from the internet):

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vff3f9X4Ik4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hzBd4qzrLo

… and finally, a photo from Mike of the rear of the car:

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Rod O’Malley purchased a 1275cc MG Midget, and rebuilt the vehicle whilst still in his teens. The car was likely an ex race vehicle, notable through things like circles being painted on the doors (under layers of paint) and the sump plug being safety wired. As part of the rebuild, Rob acquired a small Wray supercharger in pieces. Having made his own manifolds to fit the Midget, the supercharger was reworked by Wray, with the casing rebored and the rotor slots tidied up before new vanes were fitted. The supercharger developed up to 5psi, though at any more loading the single vee-belt suffered slippage or breakage… Rod got around 500 miles from any given belt. Water/methanol injection was added to the Midget. The logbooked Midget would go on to serve as Rod’s road and track car, racing at circuits including Calder, Winton and Mallala. The car also saw service in motokahanas, though would only get 1½ events between gearbox failures. A 5.3:1 differential was later fitted for the Colingrove hillclimb, with the car starting in 2nd gear. Rod eventually sold the car through MG Sales (http://mgsales.net.au/).

Ed Farrar has a Wray-blown Morris Minor ute, which has travelled some 400,000 miles in Ed’s ownership. The Wray supercharger kit was purchased through Don Hall Motors in Subiaco, Perth in the late 1970's or early 1980s. The Morrie originally had a relatively standard 948cc engine, with the Wray kit only taking a few hours to fit. The first test drive of the ute, with Ed’s father riding shotgun, showed the car to be very strong. After a lap around the block Ed pulled up in the nearest straight road… the local shopping centre. From a standing start, Ed warned his father that he would see what the Morrie would do wide open. Ed got wheel spin in first, which continued through second gear. By the time Ed found third gear he was doing twice the speed limit… an inopportune time to pass the local Policeman.


After some 100,000 miles of service Ed was tiring of the engine taking a hammering from the supercharger. He purchased a complete Morris 1100s for $200, pulled the 1100cc engine and cut the end from the crank. A piece of steel was welded to the crank end and then machined to fit the standard lightened four-bolt flywheel and a Mk1 MG Midget clutch with uprated springs. In the following 300,000 miles the Wray-blown 1100 motor would only see one rebuild and one re-ring. As one of Ed’s friends found out, it’s not a good idea to bet the ute won’t do 100mph… Ed won the wager on the way to Esperance, leaving his mates brand new Honda Accord smoking at the side of the road from having tried to keep up. The Morris has seen some good loads over it’s time, often doing diving/camping duties (driver, two passengers, diving cylinders and compressor, tent, outboard motor and fuel tank, and 10’ boat on the roof). The Morrie has a new set of vanes fitted every 20 to 30 thousand miles depending on service conditions with the rotor being given a tickle each time. Ed carries a spare set of vanes under the seat in case of emergency.

Images below of the Morrie are from Ed:

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Ed has run his Wray’s hard over the years. While competing in a motorkhana at Mooliabeenee (north of Perth, Western Australia), he ran the Wray without an air filter. The gravel turned a freshly rebuilt supercharger to scrap in a single day.

Ed has also made a number of spare rotors over the years. Ed targets a drive-end rotor-to-casing clearance of 0.002”-0.004” (Norman superchargers can be set to similar tolerances, though 0.010” is typical), and a non-drive end clearance of 0.018”-0.020” (Normans are typically 0.015”, with the early Type 65’s able to be set to 0.006”-0.008”). Ed has seen some Wray superchargers with as much as 0.080” clearance.

The photo below from Ed shows a rotor being machined:

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Ed and the WA MG crowd have also continued the development and upkeep of the Wray vanes. Harry Pyle has sourced vane material. At some time in the last ten years the vane material became a problem, probably because the thickness had been rounded to millimetres. Chris Foreman of Armstrong Energy (181A Star Street Carlisle, Western Australia, telephone (08) 93612761) is able to supply the thicker vanes but can also machine them to fit the rotor. He is also cutting diagonal grooves designed by Ed Farrar to help seat the vanes against the casing. Ed originally found the concept for the grooves in an American publication on sports car modification. The grooves are shown in the image below:

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Note that this is similar to the grooves used in the Norman superchargers produced by Mike Norman (see image below). Eldred’s machines did not use grooves.

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The Farrar-modified Wray grooves are cut to one third of the vane thickness. The grooves are used to assist the vanes in being able to move in and out of the rotor. Sliding supercharger vanes are normally a “flop” fit, though may experience some changes in dimensions due to moisture, fuel properties or dirt. If the vanes become a tight fit, the oily environment they operate in may allow them to form a seal with the rotor. In this case, the vanes will draw a vacuum at the vane root as they try to slide out, or will build pressure at the vane root as they slide back in. The grooves allow the vane root to equalize pressure, allowing the vanes to slide freely. The slots also allow some flow of air/fuel/oil around the vane, helping lubrication. The Farrar-modified Wray grooves are sufficient to eliminate vane rattle at idle. At idle speed the centripetal force on the vane is low, and they can lose contact with the casing wall, giving a rattling sound. For the (Mike) Norman superchargers, the grooves are not sufficient to stop vane rattle, and springs are fitted under the vane (the square notches in the yellow vane show above are used to seat the springs). The Farrar-modified Wray grooves are angled, helping to sweep out any debris arising from vane wear.

Ed also has a complete spare Wray supercharger, and rebuilds Zoller sliding vane superchargers. Arnold Zoller (1882-1934) was Swiss machine technician, and worked for Fiat for several years designing racing engines before co-founding a business marketing the Nazzaro car. From 1917 he worked for Argus Motoren, focussing on developing the supercharger, particularly for two-stroke engines. This lead to the invention of the Zoller sliding vane supercharger in 1927, which were used in vehicles including BMW, DKW and NSU.

Another Wray-blown Morris Minor was owned by Phil Evans from the Morris Minor Centre, Adelaide. His ute ran a standard 948cc motor with extractors and the supercharger, and was used as the regular pick-up and delivery vehicle for the business.

The photos below, from the owner, show Tim Billington’s T96 Wray. This machine was purchased by Tim from a Mr Booth of Cooroy, Queensland around two years ago. It is an early Wray, with the early Mark 1 type porting. The manifold face that can be seen with a looooong stud hanging out of one hole was later modified by Wray to have four smaller bolts in addition to the three shown on Tim’s. Tim’s fabricated tensioner is not a factory (cast) Wray unit. On the periphery of both the casing a hole is noticeable at about the one o’clock position. This hole is used to install a locating dowel, that ensures the end-plates are rotated correctly with respect to the casing’s inlet and outlet ports. The end plates have a similar hole, along with another 180º around the periphery. The original Wray tooling has provision for drilling these holes (we’ll hear more about the tooling later), though not all Wrays had the dowels drilled. The carburettor-to-supercharger manifold (complete with grey motor BXOV-1 Stromberg carburettor) was cast before the pattern was altered to allow for both downdraught and sidedraught carburettors - the sidedraught carburettor boss is absent, and the speed stripes and “W” is as cast, not machined down as per the later Wray manifolds. Tim’s machine is destined for a Holden grey motor.

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Gary Crosswell’s FC sedan is Wray-blown with an L96 (serial number L96/105), running on the over-bored (149ci) Holden grey motor. In lieu of the normal Stromberg, Gary’s Wray is fed by one of Eldred Norman’s massive 3” SUs.

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Video of Gary’s machine is here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0x9rSqMfkKk

5. The Last Wrays
The last production of the Wray supercharger was an order in 1983, consisting of a mix of twelve superchargers (eleven small and one large model) for the MG TC Owners Club in Perth. These were to be installed on 1250cc MG TC and TD's, with the larger supercharger for 1588cc-1622cc MGA's. Interest in the order was sparked by Ed Farrar, with the order placed by Harry Pyle. Darryl Robins and Harry attended the MG Nationals meeting in Geelong in their MGTC’s. On the return trip to Perth they called into Wray Engineering and collected the batch of superchargers. Darryl had no passenger on the trip back and was able to carry most of the superchargers on the floor of his car, whilst Harry had two behind his seat. Harry would later note that in trying to fit one of the superchargers to an MGTC, a very large hole is required in the louvered bonnet side. Harry’s son Philip engineered a clever modification, turning the supercharger so that the inlet becomes the outlet and rephasing the end plates so compression happens between the inlet port and manifold port. This also entails drilling additional holes in the end plates – see photo below

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Harry would go on to run the Wray-blown MGTC for six years as everyday transport. It is suspected that the supercharger is currently running on Kevin McMahon’s MG TC & Y Special, which we saw above. Harry was told in Adelaide that the patterns for the large supercharger would be destroyed, and that his was the last of the line. Thankfully, the moulds survived, and would lead to a later generation of superchargers… more on that below. Harry’s large Wray passed on to his son Philip, then to Colin Bonney unused, then onto Mike Sherrell. John Bowles assisted Mike by designing and building brackets and a manifold to finally fit the large Wray on to Mike's MGTC Special. The supercharger and kit were later onsold to Canada (more on this below). Philip Pyle fitted his small Wray in about 1984 to his Morris Minor convertible. Some years later Peter Compton fitted his small Wray to his MGTC. Pete Harper purchased a Wray supercharger some years ago from a Mr Muir, along with the pulley/speed scale paperwork. The machine is pictured below, running a Holley Model 1904 carburettor (the 1904 was common in Judson applications). The manifolding suits the BMC "A" series engine. The machine has never been installed or run. It is likely that this machine was part of the last batch of twelve.
 
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Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Tue Dec 08, 2015 12:35 pm

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As noted above, Harry Pyle’s large Wray was sold on to Mike Sherrell. The supercharger was destined to be fitted to Mike’s 1949 1275cc MGTC/9349 XPAW motor. In July 1998 work began on a plenum chamber, with the supercharger being fitted over the next few months. The Wray-blown MGTC was fitted with an 1¾” S.U. carburettor, running a 0.125” jet and UVF needle. It’s first outing was at the Joondalup Round the Houses meeting in October 1998, and was nothing short of spectacular. Boost was off the dial, with the MG rocketing away from the other racers at the start, only to fuel up and bang the relief valve. The mob would then swarm past the MGTC, wreathed in clouds of black smoke. The XPAW would then clear its throat and roar away after them. With enormous torque it would rocket out of the course's tight corners and soon be up and through the pack, only to have the whole process repeat itself over and over. It may have taken some time to get the grin off Mike’s face after the race. The MGTC was in for some serious tuning before it’s next outing. A larger drive pulley was fitted, reducing supercharger speed to 85.7% of engine speed. This reduced boost to a more sane level (if 12-14psi can be called sane). The relief valve spring was reset to around 16psi, whilst the SU needle was leaned up to UVA. The distributor advance was retarded severely. Tuning on the rolling road showed the MGTC was producing 80bhp at the rear wheels, almost double the factory offering and the most the dyno operator said he had seen from this type of MG engine on his equipment. The tuned MGTC made a stunning performance at Ellenbrook, Western Australia in May 2000. A sprint had been set up around the new roads and curbs of a subdivision yet to have houses built. Such an event was perfect for the small vehicle, with more than a few eyebrows raised at the performance - 56.4sec, placing it before fiftyseven other cars including Westfields, Porsche 911s, Nissan Skylines, BMW M3Rs, a Holden VT Commodore HSV GTS, Ford GTHO, Lotus Elise's, Alfa Romeo's, Jaguar E Type and Datsun 260s.

While the car was performing strongly, overheating was becoming a problem on the longer events. In November of 2002 the head gasket let go at the Wanneroo Historics meeting. Tear-down showed a totally destroyed head gasket. To combat the problem, Michael tried blocking off all the water holes between head and block with cast iron inserts, though this lead to the engine running too hot. The final solution (in December 2003) copied the factory race engines, where a 1" pipe is run from the top rear core plug to the back of the cylinder head. The MGTC has run in this guise ever since with no gasket failures and at the coolest of temperatures.

Sadly, in May 2004 disaster struck in the middle of a motorkhana. The Wray seized and stopped dead, with the engine spinning at some 6000rpm. One drive belt snapped, but the other belt kept driving. The supercharger had swallowed one vane and cracked the other three. The tear-down showed the Wray driveshaft had a 270º twist, with the pulley key disintegrated. The casing liner was 0.040" out of round, and the rotor slots opened up. After some major repairs, the Wray returned to service, thought he increased clearances would only support 8psi of boost. Michael sold the Wray, which made it’s way to Vancouver, Canada. The MGT has since been Roots-blown. The photos below, from Mike, show the Wray-blown track terror:

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6. Fred Radman and the Second Generation of Wray Superchargers
The Wray superchargers were largely being sold in batches to speedshops. Once the speedshops mark-up was added, the superchargers became expensive. The lack of demand for superchargers, possibly due to the ability to install a V8 engine with cheap horsepower into various cars; and the lack of enthusiasm by John Wray and staff (who in previous years had an interest in performance vehicles) led to the stop in production. The drawings, patterns and tooling were sold in about 1986 to Fred Radman, starting a new era in Wray superchargers.

In the late 1970’s, Fred’s interest in supercharging was sparked by the noise coming from a motorkhana being held in a nearby shopping centre carpark at Tea Tree Plaza, Adelaide. On investigation, Fred found one of the competitors to be running a Mini Moke, complete with Formula 5000 slicks. The owner of the vehicle was Rob Searle. Rob was serious about his motorkhana vehicles, having competed in a Morrie ute powered with a supercharged Holden 138 grey motor the year before. Rob had purchased a steel case/steel rotor air cooled Type 65 Norman in pieces, with one end plate missing and no vanes. Having remade the missing components, the Norman was mounted to the grey motor and fed by twin Strombergs in suck-through mode. The Norman was later transferred to the 1275cc Moke engine, and chain-driven. A custom cam was ground up by Chris Milton Motors. Rob found that the suck through system experienced throttle lag, and modified it to run blow-through. A single SU carburettor was mounted in a pressurised box, made from an old saucepan. The SU would later be replaced with a Reece Fish carburettor. A Stromberg throttle body was employed as a waste gate, controlled by flexing a Holden fuel pump diaphragm to begin wasting at some 15psi of boost, Under load, the induction and exhaust noise of the little brick engine was incredible. (photos: Fred Radman)

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Rob would later go on to wreck out the Moke, selling the Norman to Dennis Boundy to place into a Holden museum. The ex-Moke Norman supercharger is shown in Dennis’ photo below:

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Dennis is no stranger to Norman superchargers… his Norman blown FJ sedan is legendary for running some 113mph on the Lake Gairdner Great White Dyno. The FJ runs a water cooled Norman, mounted on the drivers side of the grey motor and fed by a 350 Holley. The water cooling is run through a water/air intercooler. Dennis’ photo of the Norman blown FJ are below:

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A few years later, with the noise of the Norman-blown Moke still ringing in his ears, Fred went on to purchase his first supercharger. This was a small model Wray, which had come from a Renault 8 or Renault 10. A few years later still a second Wray was purchased, again small model complete with a Mini fitment kit. The earlier supercharger was onsold to Kevin Shearer, whilst Fred still has his second supercharger.

In the late 1980’s, Fred got into contact with John Wray, who in turn directed him to a Greg Pill, who had worked for Wray and had the moulds and tooling. This was around the time that the final batch of twelve superchargers was being made the MG TC Owners Club of Perth. Fred can remember meeting John Wray, who carried a small book of engineering details Fred purchased the casing moulds and tooling, and went on to cast his first supercharger. Pictured below are some of the drawings, sketches and doodlings which came with the moulds and tooling (photos: Fred Radman):

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The pink drawing in the upper photo nearest the camera is a Holden grey motor manifold (sadly, no patterns or jigs exist for this one).

The small foundry used for Fred’s first casting run in Magill, Adelaide did not produce a satisfactory casting, and Fred changed to the Castech foundry (in Wingfield, South Australia - http://castech.net/) for all subsequent work. The casing castings for the Radman superchargers were done in CC601 (A356/A357) aluminium alloy, which was later heat treated. Machining of the raw castings was undertaken by Bob Jolly. Bob was an ex-Isle of Man bike racer who competed across Europe in the mid-1970s. Bob also scratch built JAP, Velocette, Triumph and Norton gear. He was also the owner of Bob Jolly and Co Machining, which still exists: http://bobjolly.com.au/.

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Bob's company was started in 1979 as Bob Jolly and Co Racing, with simple turning and milling operations servicing the racing community from his St Peters, Adelaide workshop. Bob relocated his workshop to Lobethal in the Adelaide Hills, and then to 82-84 Francis Road Wingfield, where they still operate today. All the rotors machined by Bob have distinctive rotor vane slots. The profile of the slitting saw used gives radiused roots, which lowers root stress in the rotor. The photo below (from Fred) shows the radiused vane root profile:

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Fred went on to make L60, L96 and T96 machines, along with one T60.

Fred had been told by John Wray that cast iron diesel cylinder liners were used as casing liners in the Wray superchargers. For Fred’s machines, steel bore casing was used, with diagonal ports. Unlike the original Wray superchargers, Fred’s machines had the liners honed. Rotors were machined from 6060 or 6061 aluminium alloy. Like the earlier Wrays, the vanes were made from Tuffnol, which Fred sourced from Cadillac Plastics in Adelaide.

Fred also has the patterns for the Mini and T96 inlet manifolds. The latter can be machined for a single barrel downdraught carburettor, or cut to suit a side-draught SU or injection throttle body.
The Radman superchargers mainly used downdraught Stromberg carburettors with a variable main metering jet. Pictured below (photo: Fred Radman) is a D5 factory down draft S.U carburettor, used on the early Radman Mini setups. The adaptor mates it to the stud pattern on the intake manifold. Whilst it worked well it was not an easy carburettor to source, and Fred soon changed to Stromberg carbs for ease of availability.

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Authors note: I have named the second generation of machines (made by Fred) Radman superchargers, to differentiate them from the Wray supercharger. Fred is modest, and views them as Wrays. I personally think though that anyone who manufactures superchargers from scratch, and continues their development deserves more than a little recognition… hence I’ve kept the Radman naming.

Around one dozen of the Radman superchargers were made, with the finished machines selling for cost at around $1000. Some of the superchargers were stamped with model and serial numbers, whilst others were not. The first of the Radman superchargers was sold to Peter Wilson in Adelaide on the 15th of January 1993 as a “kit” of parts. The liner was not machined for inlet/outlet ports, with Peter undertaking his own port timing. Peter built a Morris 8 special, named Pieces of Eight. Pieces of Eight was built in South Australia between 1988 and 1990, based on a 1937 UK Morris 8 special. It is a fully CAMS accredited Group K vehicle. It has a Morris 8 four-cylinder side valve engine, with the supercharger running at 12psi. It runs a single 1¾” SU on avgas. The car has finned 8” brakes driven by original 1935 hydraulics. Suspension is by Hartford friction shock absorbers, keeping the bounce out of 16”x3½” Dunlop magna wire polished alloy wheels.

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The images below (photos: Fred Radman) shows the original Radman supercharger made for Pieces of Eight, along with the original 2” SU carburettor supplied. To fit between the dumb irons on the chassis it was machined down so as to have only one bearing on the input end. The supercharger is directly driven from the Morrie’s crankshaft.

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After the car was sold the supercharger rotor was subsequently shortened and a spacer fitted inside the casing to lower the capacity. Such modifications, whilst unusual, were not unique. Bob Jolly took a T96 casting and cut and shut it to make a T60 for Dave Linton (perhaps the only T60 ever made). Jim Howard from Slider Engineering hard anodised the rotor and also machined and anodised the tooth belt pulley. The cut and shut T60 unit would later be fitted to an Austin 7 race car.

The second Radman supercharger was also sold to another Morris 8 owner, with a further Radman going to an Alfa Romeo-powered Amilcar.

Fred moved to the UK, with sales of the Radman Wrays continuing in his absence by Bob Jolley, Dave Linton and Phil Evans. When Bob sold a supercharger, he often stamped a small “R” (for Robert) into the casing. The “R” is shown in the image below of a T96 Wray (photo: Fred Radman).

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Fred sold two superchargers whilst in the UK to John Bibby, who rebuilt Shorrock and other superchargers. John still trades as John Bibby Superchargers (72 Feiashill Road Trysull Wolverhampton West Midlands WV5 7HT). The image below (photo: Fred Radman) was taken in the UK at John Bibby’s place, and shows a Cozette eccentric vane supercharger, a Wray L60 sliding vane supercharger and a Shorrock C75 eccentric vane supercharger.

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Whilst in the UK Fred continued his research, speaking to Tuffnol about improved vane materials.
Sadly, the increasing availability of the Aisin superchargers used by Toyota reduced the market for the Radman superchargers, and no further batches were made. Fred still has a number of the castings and complete machines – the photo below (photo: Fred Radman) shows a manifold Fred recently machined:

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Regards,
Harv (deputy apprentice Wray supercharger affecionado).
 
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Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:43 am

Ladies and gents,

This post will focus on some of the historic documents that I have been able to get access to of late.

Recently, I have been able to access a copy of the “GO! With Safety” brochure that Eldred printed in the mid 1960’s (no later than 1965… see the Eddie Thomas catalogue below) whilst still living at Tolleys Road, Hope Valley South Australia. My thanks to the gentlemen who lent me a copy… the only one I have seen for sale sold some years ago on eBay for $400 (!). The brochure covers the sale of Type 65 Norman kits for the grey motor (to suit all Holden models, 1948-1963 inclusive). Eldred was selling two kits – one to suit all models FX-FJ (£107 10’), and one to suit all models FE-EJ (£111). In the copy of the brochure, the earlier kit had been discontinued (crossed out by pen) and the latter kit modified to suit FX-EJ (i.e. only one kit for all grey motors). Eldred was also selling bare superchargers for £57 10’, along with individual spare parts (casings, end plates, vanes, bearings, seals, crank and supercharger pullies, supercharger and generator brackets, supercharger outlet and inlet manifolds and elbows). It is interesting that the kits were such that “the average man with a comparatively slight mechanical knowledge can fit it in approximately one half day”. Equally interesting that the tools needed were a hammer, cold chisel, pliers, screwdriver, 10” and 8” shifter and an 18” tyre iron.

Eldred’s take on supercharging the grey was interesting. The kits were designed for the Holden grey motor, or engines of 1000-2500cc. Eldred notes the manifolds were slotted for the BXOV-1 carburettor, or a much larger Nicchi (Nikki) 1 5/8” downdraught which Eldred sold (the Stromberg gave just as good at low and medium speeds, though the Nikki was better up top). This has got me curious - anyone know a vehicle in Australia in the early sixties running a large single barrel Nikki? For the grey, the kits ran at 1.1 times engine speed to give 5psi boost at 30mph and top gear, and 3 psi at 20mph and top gear with the FB-EJ bore (slightly higher with the smaller FX-FC 3” bore). The kits required the use of super fuel, with Eldred noting he was intending to market an 8spi boost unit that had to use 115 octane fuel (bear in mind that modern Aussie pump fuel is typically 91RON, whilst E85 is 105RON and methanol is 109RON). From Eldred: “The supercharger will not give you a racing car’s performance – certainly not on pump fuel, but it will put you on a par with a Valiant or a Holden 179 in acceleration, particularly in top gear. If you tow a boat or a caravan or like to “feel” a car, you cannot afford to be without a supercharger".

The second brochure I have been able to access is a pricelist from the late 60’s. Prices are in dollars, so this is at least 1966 (bear in mind that Eldred moved to Noosa in 1966, and passed away in mid 1971). The prices are all quoted as for Queensland delivery with freight additional – it is a fair bet that Eldred had moved to Noosa by this stage. The brochure indicates the following models of Norman supercharger were available:
Type 65 Standard
Type 65 Lightweight (LW)
Type 65 Super Lightweight (SLW)
Type 70 Lightweight (LW)
Type 70 Super Lightweight (SLW)
Type 75S Lightweight (LW)
Type 75S Lightweight (LW) Deluxe
Type 110 Leightweight (LW)
Type 265 Standard
Type 265 Lightweight (LW)
Type 265 Super Lightweight (SLW)
Type 270 Lightweight (LW)
Type 270 Super Lightweight (SLW)
Standard models have a cast iron casing and a steel rotor. Lightweight models change to aluminium casings (cast iron or steel lined), whilst the Super Lighweight units have aluminium casings, tufftrided cast iron or steel liners and a lightened tufftrided steel rotor. Aluminium rotors are not offered. It is interesting that some of Eldred’s other machines (the Type 45, Type 90 and Type 110) are not offered for sale. The engine capacities suggested for each size machine are as follows:
Type 65: 1250-2250cc (note the GO! With Safety brochure advise above of 1000-2500cc)
Type 70: 1750-2750cc
Type 75S: 2250-3250cc
Type 265: 2500-4500cc
Type 270: 3000-5500cc
Worked motors are recommended to use 2/3 of the above capacities. The brochure indicates that early Holden kits are available for Type 65 and Type 70 superchargers, whilst H-model Holden kits are available using the Type 75. A kit for the Toyota 1900cc motor is also indicated.

A (third) separate pricing brochure adds the Type 110 (both Lightweight and Super-Lite), indicating a target motor of 2500-3500cc. This brochure indicates that the H-series Holden kits are based on the Type 110, using either two 1 ¾” or two 2” SUs. This brochure again indicates early Holden kits using the Type 65 or Type 70, using either the original BXOV-1 Stromberg carburettor or a 2” SU. Interestingly, this brochure indicates that both the Type 70 and Type 110 can be offered with a clutch drive (I have only seen this previously on Type 45, Type 75 and Type 90 machines).

The fourth brochure below was used to sell Mike’s Normans:
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The fifth brochure is a 1965 catalogue for the Eddie Thomas Speed Shop, which draws material verbatim from the Go! with Safety brochure described above:
[URL=http://s929.photobucket.com/user/V8EKwagon/media/Eddie%20Thomas%20catalogue%201_zpsb7or6wgg.jpg.html]Image

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The next pieces of this post are magazine articles that I have had for a while, and have drawn on as this thread has developed. Pieces of the magazines have been posted previously, though I will post the entire articles here. The magazine articles are a little less reliable than the brochures and catalogues above… there is sometimes some artistic license used by the writer. The first (and probably most recognizable) is the Blow For Go Norman Style article from Australian Hot Rod of November 1966:
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The second is the Blowers for Holdens! article from The Australian Hot Rodding Review of January 1967:
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The third is an article from Hot Holdens and Customs #2, depicting the Norman-blown Alki-Burner:
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The fourth is an article from The Australian Hot Rodding Review of June 1968, showing the Norman-blown Bobcat:
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The fifth is an article from Adelaide’s The News of September 28th 1964:
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I have copies of another three articles (The Blow for Go! article from the 2009 Street Machine Hot Rod Annual, the Dirty Stuff column from Street Machine of May 2014, and the article on Grantley’s Norman-blown FJ from Chopped Nº. 7), though these are pretty new and I am seeking permission from the publishers to post them here.

Cheers,
Harv (deputy apprentice Norman supercharger fiddler).
 
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Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 7:52 am

Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Sat Jan 23, 2016 12:29 pm

Ladies and Gents,

It appears that a number of different logos were used for the Norman superchargers. The picture below shows a metal badge affixed to the side of a Type 65 supercharger, taken from the GO! With Safety brochure.

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I have never seen one of these affixed to a Type 65 in the flesh, nor can I see how they attach... they may have been sticky-taped on for the brochure photos. The logo however is similar (if not identical) to the ones used on the Rowe/Wigzell WonderCar:

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A different logo is shown in the1966 Blow for GO! Article as an EJ Holden window sticker:

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Cheers,
Harv
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 7:52 am

Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Sun Jan 24, 2016 10:09 am

Ladies and gents,

One extraordinary document I have been able to lay my hands on (with thanks, Ed) is a copy of a thesis written in November 1985 - Rotary Vane Compressors, Testing and re-design of a sliding vane compressor for supercharging. The thesis was authored by Mark Hammond and Edward Vieusseux at the NSWIT. Hammond and Vieusseux’s project evaluated the suitability of a Norman to supercharge engines up to 2,000cc capacity. The work undertook extensive bench testing, including analysis of alternative vane materials. The test mule for this work was one of Mike’s 200 Normans, casing number 2000002S, as shown below:

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The test rig drove plain air (and in some cases lubricant spray) through the Norman, using a waterbrake dyno driven by a BMC 1800cc engine. Different casing liners were used to give different port timings (0% compression, the standard 16% compression, and a higher 32% compression), along with two rotors (3- and 4-vane).
Some learnings from the thesis:
• The Norman supercharger has an adiabatic efficiency of 45-60% for 2-10psi boost. This lines up pretty well with the numbers I have used earlier in this post when we modelled the Norman. I had assumed 60%, whilst other resources indicate 70% (Eldred) and 50-65% (Corky Bell).
• At 4000rpm (typical operating range for a wide-open early Holden Norman), the volumetric efficiency starts at around 80% at 2psi boost, and drops to 70% at 10psi. Increasing pressure ratio lowers the efficiency due to the increased internal pressure recirculating gas within the supercharger. This is a little lower than the values I used in the modelling – I assumed 90%, compared to literature values of 82-90% (William Lyons), 90% (Royce Brown) and 85% (C.F. Taylor).
• The 200 Norman casing was measured (using the modern method, not Eldred's method) to give 115ci/rev (very similar to the Type 65). The 16% internal compression ratio of a standard Norman was close to optimal (i.e. increasing or decreasing internal compression was not beneficial).
• Four vane materialss were tested: Bakelite, Feroform F31 (similar to the Feroform F57 I have discussed earlier), Tuffclad Moly (a self-lubricating thermoplastic) and Nylacast Moly (a self lubricating thermoplastic filled with nylon). Of note:
a) vane wear for the Bakelite was very similar to that noted by Mike Norman – about 4-5mm per 20,000km of driving. One of the reasons for this is that Mike’s design has a very high vane tip speed due to it’s large casing diameter – some 49m/s at 6000rpm, which is nearly four times faster than a grey motor piston at redline.
b) using water alone as a lubricant for Bakelite vanes lead to liner scoring. Oil is required.
c) water can be used as a lubricant for the Feroform and Tuffclad Moly materials. It removes frictional heat far better than oil, probably by partial vapourisation.
c) friction power loss was not noticeably different for the different vane materials. However, the Nylacast Moly vanes tended to pick-up in the vane slots (even with water lubrication) and hence are not suitable.
d) Both the Nylacast Moly and Tuffcast Moly were more susceptible to delamination or cracking than Bakelite. The slots cut out for the vane spring carriers act as a stress riser.
• Vane rattle was examined, and found to be due to:
a) too much clearance between the vane and slot. This stops once operating temperature is reached. Note that a clearance of 0.005” was recommended for Bakelite vanes (this is perhaps a little more accurate than Eldred’s “flop fit” specification), and is a useful number for anyone milling down their own replacement vanes.
b) low speeds (<1500rpm) where the small centrifugal forces are unable to overcome slot friction and the weight of the vanes. This is where the vane springs are useful. Of note, there was no discernible power loss from using the vane springs (i.e. they do not increase friction, as the centrifugal forces on the vanes far exceed the spring tension).
• Whilst four-vane rotors are more efficient and do not increase shaft power, they are not a simple swap-in for the exiting Normans. Four-vane rotors were tried, but delaminated over 2000 pm as the vane stroke was too high in the existing casing. A word to the wise – if replacing the rotor in one of Mike’s Normans, do not be tempted to use a 4-vane design unless the end-plates are remanufactured to give less vane stroke.
• The seal between the end-plate and casing was effected through the use of a synthetic sealing strip (I have yet to find one of these in a Norman… they tend to get discarded, and replaced with a line of sealant like Sikaflex
• Just like Roots superchargers, the positive displacement Norman delivers a pulsing flow at the discharge ports. Four-vane rotors delivered smoother flow than three-vane rotors. The attached graph shows how the discharge pressure changes over time. Note that a Norman running at a nominal boost pressure of 10psi has the discharge port oscillating between 7 and 11 psi (albeit over a very short time frame).

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• The nature and surface finish of all sliding surfaces have to be very hard and smooth to reduce friction and vane wear. A surface finish of <16µinch is recommended, as per the red line in the chart below. As a comparison, a rough turned item with visible toolmarks is about 500µinch, a smooth machined surface around 125µinch, bearing surfaces are around 32µinch, and fine lapped surfaces are around 1µinch.

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The document also contains a compressor map for the 200 Norman – this is the only Norman compressor map that I am aware of:

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Cheers,
Harv (deputy apprentice Norman supercharger fiddler).
 
Posts: 487
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Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Mon Feb 15, 2016 12:09 pm

Ladies and Gents,

A quick post to share with you an article from Chopped No. 7. The article features Grantley’s Norman-blown humpy. Thanks to Kyle for providing approval to publish the copyrighted article here.

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Cheers,
Harv
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 7:52 am

Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Tue Apr 05, 2016 2:41 pm

Ladies and Gents,

Attached below some more photos of Matt Brown’s Norman. From what I can see:

It's a Type 65 Norman. It could either by a Lightweight (solid steel rotor) or Super Lightweight (steel rotor made hollow by welding steel plates together). Matt has weighed the machine, and it seems very light (10.7kg, whilst Gary Claypole's Lightweight weighs 20kg). I am itching to see the rotor in Matt’s machine… it could well be a Super Lightweight rotor, which I have not yet seen before in the flesh. Looks like a home-made carburettor-to-supercharger manifold, but a pretty good copy nonetheless.

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The casting number (22) is pretty meaningless. All the alloy cased Type 65's that I have seen (e.g. Paus, Gary Claypole's) have that same casting number.

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The drive-end plate stamping (516) is interesting, and more like a serial number. The numbers were not consistently applied by Eldred though (for example neither Paul nor Gary's has an end-plate stamping). This is the third one I've seen - Ian Barnard has 522, and Ted Robinette has 513, both on steel-cased Type 65’s.

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The non-drive end is interesting. Most Type 65's have a plain end-plate boss, into which is driven a welsh plug. Matt’s machine non-drive end end-plate has been drilled and tapped for four setscrews. I have seen this on other machines, including both my Type 45 and Type 75. I suspect that the four holes mean that Matt’s machine was once fitted up with a clutch (the same as my Type 75), which would make it a Deluxe. The four holes allow the clutch hydraulic driver unit to be bolted to the non-drive end of the Norman. The other clue is that the non-drive end of Matt’s driveshaft has a nut fitted, the same as my clutched Type 75. The non-clutched Normans (like Gary’s) have just a bare shaft sticking out through the bearing on the non-drive end.

I've seen rotation directions stamped into Normans before, sometimes as plain arrows, sometimes as ROTATION, but this is the first one I've seen with MUST ROTATE stamped into it.

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Matt has two supercharger-to-cylinder head manifolds. One looks to be made from steel, and mounts the supercharger up high (this is the one that is being used to mount the Norman to the red-painted grey motor in the photos above). This is period correct. The other manifold is used to mount the supercharger low, in the place that the generator normally sits. The slip-in flange is unusual, and probably robbed off an original carburettor-to-supercharger manifold - they normally have a hose connected where you have the flange. There are very few of these manifolds surviving - Anthony Harradine's supercharger (ex Bobcat) in his EJ Premier is one of few.

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Cheers,
Harv
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 7:52 am

Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Sun Apr 24, 2016 10:58 am

One project that is slowly percolating along is my meth monster Norman. I intend to Norman-supercharge my FB daily driver, and putt around running on SU carbs and petrol fuel. For the nostalgia drags (and maybe some Wednesday night WSID drags) I will change the intake to Hilborn injection, and the fuel to methanol. I’ve got the supercharger and injection, and have been slowly piecing together the other bits (dry sump etc). I’ve been slowly accumulating the bits for the fuel system:
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I wanted a Moon tank to fuel the alky into the meth monster. It took me a while, but I finally got all the bits together and got the fuel tank made up. The Moon tank will sit in front of the grille, and be able to be removed when the car is in daily-driver use. I looked at buying a genuine Moon tank, but they are around $550. They do not have enough fittings for fuel injection, so I would have to have some nipples TIG welded in. They are also not baffled (the fuel return would churn the tank up), so the Moon tank would also need to be cut open to put in a baffle. For that much money, and still needing work, I figured there had to be a better way.

I took a brand-new 8.5kg gas bottle, which owes me about $30 from Bunnings. Assuming the tank is about 75% full, and that the meth-monster is punching out around 150BHP, the tank should last about 20 minutes on petrol, or 8 minutes on methanol. 8 minutes should be enough for queueing in the staging lanes, a run down the strip, and the return lane drive back to the pits.

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I cut the foot ring and valve collar off the bottle, and ground the welds flush. The inlet/outlet valve for the bottle unscrews. It is a tapered gas thread (¾”-14NGT), and took a damn long extension bar to get enough torque to get if off. I don’t need that particular hole, and sourced a plug to suit. Finding a NGT plug is near impossible, and I ended up having a good conversation with Gameco (http://gameco.com.au/) who confirmed that ¾”-14NPT is very similar to NGT, and close enough for what I intend to do with it. Probably wouldn’t use a NPT plug for LPG service, but OK for this job.

I then marked out and drilled holes for the fittings. The top of the tank has two returns (primary and secondary bypass), which have -6AN nipples (the equivalent of 3/8” pipe). I made a slit in the tank wall, and have inserted some steel plate 1” under the two return lines. This plate acts as a baffle/splash plate, preventing the returning fuel from stirring up (and aerating) the tank contents. This type of baffling is recommended by Kinsler for Moon tanks (see the diagram down the bottom of page 179: http://www.kinsler.com/Kinsler-Handbook/HTML/#178). The tank has another -6AN nipple for a tank breather. The breather gets a nice filter, and also a rollover valve (in case things go pear-shaped). The fuel tank outlet (under the tank) is plumbed with a -8AN nipple (½” pipe). A second -8AN nipple will let me fit a drain cock. I used an early Holden filler neck (many thanks Jim), which has an original Holden cap on it (should match the era of the FB nicely). The ANDRA rules require that the cap be “positively locked”. There is a small lug on the tank to anchor safety wire. I will drill a small hole in the cap to suit the safety wire, and solder the original cap vent hole shut.

The two legs under the tank have been cut from steel plate. They are a little long for now, but can be trimmed later. I will make up some brackets to pick up the FB bumper bar irons (plan at this stage is to unbolt the bumper bar centre section and leave the two end sections in place). Still got to give the tank a rub back and some paint… not sure what colour yet but probably silver RustGuard.

By using scrap, and my brother-in-laws welding skills, the tank owes me about $60 all up. By the time I refitted a Moon tank it would have cost $620. Not a bad saving.

Cheers,
Harv
 
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Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Tue May 31, 2016 1:17 pm

Ladies and gents,

Having spoken to the seller, I thought I’d post some more info on the Norman that is currently on eBay, along with some things that stood out for me.

The unit is a water cooled, cast iron cased Type 65. The unit was run in an FJ Holden hillclimb car in the early 90’s. The unit had gone through several owners (mainly changing hands without being on a car) prior to purchase. The humpy was running a grey motor with a Vauxhall 12-port head and crank. The motor had been bored out significantly, and had a habit of blowing the copper head gaskets (between bores) when running in supercharged configuration.

The vehicle originally ran motorcycle carbs (probably Amals), though suffered from fuel surge. The carbs were replaced by the Norman, fed by the twin 2” SUs (that’s a lotta carb for a Norman blown grey that is not running alky). The Norman was later replaced by triple SUs. The vehicle ran BP100, with water injection. Drive for the Norman was taken from a chain. This required a significant drive shaft extension, made to be a tapered (interference) fit to the original supercharger drive shaft. The driveshaft extension has been subsequently cut off. The Norman was run without water cooling (due to the short duration hill climbs it was used for), with the water inlet/outlets blocked by brass plugs.

The Norman has been rephrased at some stage – notice that the end plate holes have been redrilled. The end plates are eccentric, so turning them in this manner moves the “low point” (where the rotor is closest to the casing). This can change both the Norman capacity and pressure output (depending on how much rotation is achieved, and in which direction). It would be interesting to see the internals of this machine to map out the exact change (hint hint… if someone purchases this machine, please give me a yell and I’ll walk you through how to remeasure the Norman). Rephasing Normans is unusual, though is relatively common in Wray machines amongst the MGTC crowd (see my Wray anecdote for details of this).

The Norman is also unusual in that this is the first time I have seen the serial number (481) stamped on the casing and the carburettor-to-supercharger manifold. All other early Normans I have seen have been either unstamped, or stamped on the end plates only. Note that the non-drive end plates on this machine have not been drilled and tapped, signifying it has been a Standard (unclutched) model rather than a Deluxe (clutched).

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Cheers,
Harv
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 7:52 am

Re: Harv's Norman supercharger thread

by Harv » Sun Jun 05, 2016 6:08 pm

Ladies and gents,

I was working through my Norman notes, and came across some material that I don’t think I’ve posted before – apologies in advance if I have.

In my previous Wray supercharger anecdote, I mentioned that in the local (Australian) forced induction field there were numerous people bolting on (or making kits for) imported superchargers in the 50’s and 60’s. Whilst this is a little different to Norman and Wray (who were building superchargers from scratch), the kit builders were both contemporaries and competitors to the Norman supercharger.

One such contemporary was Barry Ekins. Barry originally became interested in superchargers when he bought a Marshall-blown 1300cc MG/TA Special around 1959. The car, owned by Alan Tomlinson, had previously won the 1939 Australian Grand Prix in Lobethal, South Australia. Tomlinson, who won the AGP at age 22 and is shown in the event in the photo below, has described the circuit as “bloody dangerous” to drive on.

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Barry operated in the late 1960’s in Sydney, utilising the Marshall-Nordec Roots-type supercharger.
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Marshall is a large UK automotive and aircraft company, which started in the early 1900's and continues to operate today. I have confirmed that this “Marshall” neither manufactured superchargers, nor licensed the design (with thanks to Marshall, who were incredibly helpful). Sir George Godfrey and Partners made Marshall-Roots superchargers, both for aviation service and for automotive use. There are a number of advertisements advertising them doing so:
http://www.aviationancestry.co.uk/?comp ... 6+Partners
Godfrey traded from at least the 1930’s, until being taken over by Howden Wade Ltd (who were once Wade Engineering, and now trade as Hadron SR) in 1955. I have been unable to trace back the origins of the “Marshall” component of the Marshall-Rootes name for these type of superchargers, despite much hunting.

Godfrey supplied the Marshall-Godfrey superchargers for the World War 2 effort, where they were used as high-altitude aircraft cabin blowers and for snorkel blowing on submarines. Following the war, a significant number of these machines were surplus. L.M. Ballamy was able to secure the rights to use these surplus machines for automotive supercharging. Ballamy did not manufacture the superchargers, rather they “kitted” them into post-war vehicles including Ford 8s and 10s, Vauxhall 10s and 12s, MG TCs and even at least one E93a Ford Prefect. Ballamy’s company, L.M. Ballamy, Consulting and Experimental Engineers began in the UK in 1939. In 1946 the business was reorganised as North Downs Engineering Co (Nordec). The company continued supplying supercharging kits (based on the Marshall supercharger) as well as retaining the rights to some of Ballamy’s patents. In 1947 some of Nordecs engineers, designers and managers departed to form Wade Superchargers. Thus both Nordec’s staff, and Godfrey’s company, ended up with Wade. Wade derives from it’s company name from those of the founders, Bryan Winslett and Costin Densham. Wade is familiar to many Aussies for their Rootes-type RO superchargers, including the model RO20 utilized on Peter Brock’s 1970 HDT 186ci LC GTR Torana rallycross vehicle “The Beast”.

But I digress :D

Barry sourced the superchargers (originally intended for either aircraft cabin pressurisation or industrial service) from Marshall-Nordec in the UK, along with some aircraft repair companies. A visit to the UK in 1968 saw Barry return with around 150 superchargers. Barry would provide his "tame pattern maker" with manifold mock-ups (two flanges and a piece of bent wire), with the pattern maker delivering to him the finished cast manifolds. Relief valves for the machines (originally intended for air compressors) were manufactured by Clisby, and sourced from McPhersons hardware in the Sydney CBD. Barry used ex-aircraft gauges, plumbed with copper pipe. Whilst the thermostats were removed when fitting an Ekins kit to a Mini, the grey motor kit thermostats were soldered/braised open (Barry found that removing them directed the flow of water at the radiator cap, blowing it off).
Barry made kits for around 400 vehicles, including around 25 Holdens and 100 Volkswagens (which largely used the J-75 model Marshall-Nordec). The image below shows the Volkswagen kit:

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The image below shows a typical endplate made by Ekins:

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Barry’s machines were also used in some historic racers, and some ski boats (Barry was interested in skiing as a hobby). The majority of Barry’s works were done in 1968. Barry remembers supercharging a new Holden Monaro (probably a HG or HT). The customer wanted the largest setup available, and despite Barry’s advice a supercharger and manifold was imported from the US… costing half as much again as the new vehicle price. The kit was removed after one years use due to the high fuel costs. When Barry ceased his supercharger work he pursued his own Volkswagen service business. Most of the manifold moulds have since been destroyed.

The “BLOW it Man” article below, from The Australian Hot Rodding Review of November 1968 shows some of Barry’s work.
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Cheers,
Harv
 
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